Portugal will have the largest floating wind turbine in the world

The world’s largest floating wind turbine, which has a power of 8.4 MW, will be installed 20 kilometers off the Portuguese coast.

Portugal will install on its shores the second largest maritime wind farm in the world. The chosen place has been 20 kilometers from Viana do Castelo, a town in the north of the country at the mouth of the Limia river. The first floating wind turbine will be installed within months or weeks and will be the largest in the world in its class.

This floating wind turbine will have a power of 8.4 MW. But the total maritime wind farm will be 25 MW, enough to supply 60,000 homes. The project is led by a consortium in which the Portuguese EDP Renewables, the French ENGIE or the Spanish Repsol participate.

The WindEurope sector association expects that by 2021 a 350 MW of floating wind power will be installed on the continent. By 2030 the goal is between 4 and 5 GW. In this sense, the importance of having powerful wind turbines makes work easier. It will be necessary to install fewer of them to achieve the same capacity, an advantage taking into account installation difficulties and water costs.

At the moment the largest wind farm that exists is the North Sea project, which will occupy a total of 6 square kilometers. The investment to complete the park will be 1,750 million dollars.

The Portuguese strength in renewable energy

The neighboring country of Spain has demonstrated in the previous years a great capacity for energy adaptation. Portugal has taken advantage of the qualities that its climate offers, windy on the coasts – a huge escape that overlooks the Atlantic – and sunny in most of the country.

Walney Extension

The installation of solar panels and, above all, of a floating wind turbine has progressed to forced marches in the country. This has caused Portugal to have achieved some milestones related to renewable energy generation. In 2018, throughout the month of March its renewable plants generated 103.6% of the electricity needs.

But the records don’t end here. Some details about the Portuguese solar industry were known last summer. The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) provided data on the decrease in the cost of solar energy projects. In general, since 2010 the necessary investment has fallen by 68%.

In this context, Portugal has launched a low-cost solar auction. In this way, the country is positioned as one of the European states where energy from the sun will be cheaper.

Images: futureshape, David_Kaspar

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